neck pain

Injectable Corticosteroids

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Corticosteroid injections are powerful drugs used to decrease inflammation in the body’s tissues.  Corticosteroid injections can treat a range of muscular, skeletal, and spinal conditions.  This article from KRAMES STAYWELL shows us the most common uses of corticosteroid injections:

  • Lower back pain – Lower back pain from strains, spinal stenosis, ruptured disks, and other common conditions may be treated with injectable corticosteroids to provide some reprieve from pain. Lumbar radiculopathy is pain in the buttocks, hips, or legs that stems from a pinched nerve in the lower back.  This kind of pain can usually be treated with corticosteroid injections near the pinched nerve.  If a patient is having excruciating pain, the injection may target the spinal cord area through a catheter.  Sometimes other drugs such as local anesthetics or narcotics are given in conjunction with the corticosteroid.
  • Osteoarthritis – Osteoarthritis suffers often develop inflammation and pain in their joints. An injection of corticosteroids into the affected joint can provide temporary pain relief for several weeks or even months.  After the treatment, you will need to rest the joint for at least 24 hours for the best results.
  • Carpal tunnel syndrome – Carpal tunnel syndrome may occur when a nerve in the wrist becomes compressed or pinched, causing pain and weakness in the hand. Infecting a corticosteroid in the wrist can provide immediate relief.
  • Cervical radiculopathy – This is neck pain that radiates to the shoulder and arm. It occurs when the vertebrae in the spine moves closer together, pinching a nerve in the neck.  Injecting corticosteroids near the pinched nerve may reduce pain and swelling allowing for time to heal .

Blue Ridge Orthopaedic & Spine Center has two convenient office locations in Warrenton (540) 347.9220 & Gainesville (703) 743.2814 to serve all of your Orthopaedic needs. Call us today to schedule an appointment. Same day/next day appointments are available. For more information on all comprehensive orthopaedic services we offer visit www.broava.com.

Neck Pain at Work?

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It’s  important to look at workplace ergonomics as part of treatment and prevention of neck pain.  Most often we forget.  This Spine Health article explains what you can do to reduce painful neck pain.

When sitting at a desk and looking straight ahead:

  • Eyes should point directly at the top third of your computer screen.
  • Forearms should be approximately parallel with the floor when typing.
  • Elbows should be at the side.
  • Feet should be flat on the floor with the thighs parallel with the floor.
  • If you stand or perform driving tasks, make sure that one side of the body is not constantly rotated more than the other side, and that there is as much symmetry in repetitive tasks as possible.

If you are experiencing neck pain, Blue Ridge Orthopaedic and Spine Center can help.  Our team of board certified/ fellowship trained physicians, as well as our physical therapy and rehabilitation department (including massage therapy) will diagnose your neck pain and develop a treatment plan that is right for you.

Blue Ridge Orthopaedic & Spine Center has two convenient office locations in Warrenton (540) 347.9220 & Gainesville (703) 743.2814 to serve all of your Orthopaedic needs.  Call us today to schedule an appointment.  Same day/next day appointments available.  For more information on all comprehensive services we offer visit www.broava.com.

Stiff Neck Causes and Symptoms

Stiff Neck Causes, Symptoms and Treatment
Richard A. Staehler, MD, www.spine-health.com

A stiff neck is typically characterized by soreness and difficulty moving the neck, especially when trying to turn the head to the side. A stiff neck may also be accompanied by a headache, neck pain, shoulder pain and/or arm pain, and cause the individual to turn the entire body as opposed to the neck when trying to look sideways or backwards.

Symptoms typically last for a couple of days or a week and may prompt neck pain that ranges from mildly painful but annoying to extremely painful and limiting. While there are a few instances in which neck stiffness is a sign of a serious medical condition, most episodes of acute neck stiffness or pain heal quickly due to the durable and recuperative nature of the cervical spine.

Neck Strains and Sprains Video

The most common causes of a stiff neck include, but are not limited to, the following:

Muscle Strain or Sprain
By far the most common cause of a stiff neck is a muscle sprain or muscle strain, particularly to the levator scapula muscle. Located at the back and side of the neck, the levator scapula muscle connects the cervical spine (the neck) with the shoulder. This muscle is controlled by the third and fourth cervical nerves (C3, C4).

The levator scapula muscle may be strained or sprained throughout the course of many common, everyday activities, such as:

  • Sleeping in a position that strains the neck muscles
  • Sports injuries that strain the neck
  • Any activity that involves repeatedly turning the head from side to side, such as swimming the front crawl stroke
  • Poor posture, such as slouching while viewing the computer monitor
  • Excessive stress, which can lead to tension in the neck
  • Holding the neck in an abnormal position for a long period, such as cradling a phone between the neck and shoulder.

Meningitis / Infection
A stiff neck, in conjunction with a high fever, headache, nausea or vomiting, sleepiness and other symptoms, may be indicative of meningitis, a bacterial inflection that causes the protective membranes of the brain and spinal cord to be inflamed. Other infections can also cause stiff neck symptoms, such as meningococcal disease, an infection in the cervical spine. Any time a stiff neck is accompanied by a fever, it is advisable to seek immediate medical attention to check for these possibilities.

Cervical Spine Disorders
Many problems in the cervical spine can lead to neck stiffness. The stiffness can be a reaction to the underlying disorder in the cervical spine. For example, a cervical herniated disc or cervical osteoarthritis can lead to neck stiffness, as the structures and nerve pathways in the cervical spine are all interconnected and a problem in any one area can lead to muscle spasm and/or muscle stiffness.

Stiff Neck Treatment

As a general rule, it is advisable to seek medical attention if the stiff neck symptoms do not subside after one week. Immediate medical attention is recommended if neck stiffness is noted after a traumatic injury, or if there are additional troublesome symptoms, such as a high fever.

In the vast majority of cases, a stiff neck may be treated within a few days.

 

 

BRO-Logo-color
Blue Ridge Orthopaedic & Spine Center has on-site state-of-the-art technology to diagnosis and treat orthopaedic conditions. Both of our offices are equipped with in-office  radiology departments. Not only does this facilitate rapid diagnosis but it is also convenient for patients who may be experiencing pain or disability at the time of their visit. To schedule an appointment with one of our board-certified and fellowship trained physicians, call our Warrenton office at 540-347-9220 or our Gainesville office at 703-743-2814.

When the excuse, I slept on it wrong, doesn’t work anymore.

Stiff Neck Causes, Symptoms and Treatment
Spine-Health.com – Richard A. Staehler, MD

A stiff neck is typically characterized by soreness and difficulty moving the neck, especially when trying to turn the head to the side. A stiff neck may also be accompanied by a headache, neck pain, shoulder pain and/or arm pain, and cause the individual to turn the entire body as opposed to the neck when trying to look sideways or backwards.

Symptoms typically last for a couple of days or a week and may prompt neck pain that ranges from mildly painful but annoying to extremely painful and limiting. While there are a few instances in which neck stiffness is a sign of a serious medical condition, most episodes of acute neck stiffness or pain heal quickly due to the durable and recuperative nature of the cervical spine.

Stiff Neck Causes and Symptoms
The most common causes of a stiff neck include, but are not limited to, the following:

Muscle Strain or Sprain
By far the most common cause of a stiff neck is a muscle sprain or muscle strain, particularly to the levator scapula muscle. Located at the back and side of the neck, the levator scapula muscle connects the cervical spine (the neck) with the shoulder. This muscle is controlled by the third and fourth cervical nerves (C3, C4).

The levator scapula muscle may be strained or sprained throughout the course of many common, everyday activities, such as:

  • Sleeping in a position that strains the neck muscles
  • Sports injuries that strain the neck
  • Any activity that involves repeatedly turning the head from side to side, such as swimming the front crawl stroke
  • Poor posture, such as slouching while viewing the computer monitor
  • Excessive stress, which can lead to tension in the neck
  • Holding the neck in an abnormal position for a long period, such as cradling a phone between the neck and shoulder.

Meningitis / Infection
A stiff neck, in conjunction with a high fever, headache, nausea or vomiting, sleepiness and other symptoms, may be indicative of meningitis, a bacterial inflection that causes the protective membranes of the brain and spinal cord to be inflamed. Other infections can also cause stiff neck symptoms, such as meningococcal disease, an infection in the cervical spine. Any time a stiff neck is accompanied by a fever, it is advisable to seek immediate medical attention to check for these possibilities.

Cervical Spine Disorders
Many problems in the cervical spine can lead to neck stiffness. The stiffness can be a reaction to the underlying disorder in the cervical spine. For example, a cervical herniated disc or cervical osteoarthritis can lead to neck stiffness, as the structures and nerve pathways in the cervical spine are all interconnected and a problem in any one area can lead to muscle spasm and/or muscle stiffness.

Stiff Neck Treatments
As a general rule, it is advisable to seek medical attention if the stiff neck symptoms do not subside after one week. Immediate medical attention is recommended if neck stiffness is noted after a traumatic injury, or if there are additional troublesome symptoms, such as a high fever.

In the vast majority of cases, a stiff neck may be treated within a few days.
BRO-Logo-color

Blue Ridge Orthopaedic & Spine Center has on-site state-of-the-art technology to diagnosis and treat orthopaedic conditions. Both of our offices are equipped with in-office radiology departments. Not only does this facilitate rapid diagnosis but it is also convenient for patients who may be experiencing pain or disability at the time of their visit. To schedule an appointment with one of our board-certified and fellowship trained physicians, call our Warrenton office at 540-347-9220 or our Gainesville office at 703-743-2814

 

Good Posture makes all the difference!

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How Poor Posture Causes Neck Pain

Article written by: Gavin Morrison, PT    www.spine-health.com

Most neck pain that is not caused by whiplash or other trauma has a postural component as part of the underlying problem. Sitting atop the body, the health of the neck is subject to the curvature of the spine below and the position of the head above.

The neck muscle pain can be caused by the following neck muscles becoming tight:

  • Scalene muscles (three pairs of muscles that help rotate the neck)
  • Suboccipital muscles (four pairs of muscles used to rotate the head)
  • Pectoralis minor muscles (a pair of thin triangular muscles at the upper part of the chest)
  • Subscapularis muscles (a pair of large triangular muscles near each shoulder joint)
  • Levator scapulae muscles (a pair of muscles located at the back and side of the neck).

If the alignment of the head and spine is not optimal, the neck can be predisposed to injury and/or the degenerative effects of wear and tear over time.

 

Forward Head and Shoulder Posture

The most common condition that contributes to neck pain is forward head and shoulder posture. Forward head posture is when the neck slants forward placing the head in front of the shoulders. This head position leads to several problems:

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  • The forward pull of the weight of the head puts undue stress on the vertebrae of the lower neck, contributing to degenerative disc disease and other degenerative neck problems.
  • Similarly, this posture causes the muscles of the upper back to continually overwork to counterbalance the pull of gravity on the forward head.
  • This position is often accompanied by forward shoulders and a rounded upper back, which not only feeds into the neck problem but can also cause shoulder pain.

The more time spent with a forward head posture, the more likely it is that one will develop neck and shoulder problems.

 

Effects of Poor Posture on the Lower Cervical Vertebrae

The part of the neck that is particularly vulnerable to forward head posture is the lower part of the neck, just above the shoulders.

The lower cervical vertebrae (C5 and C6) may slightly slide or shear forward relative to one another as a result of the persistent pull of gravity on a forward head.

This shear force can be a problem for patients with jobs that require them to look down or forward all day, such as pharmacists who spend many hours counting pills or data entry workers who look at a computer screen.

Long-Term Negative Effects of Poor Posture

Prolonged shearing of the vertebrae from forward head posture eventually irritates the small facet joints in the neck as well as the ligaments and soft tissues.

This irritation can result in neck pain that radiates down to the shoulder blades and upper back, potentially causing a variety of conditions, including:

 

Workplace Ergonomics and Neck Pain

It is often important to look at the workplace ergonomics as part of treatment and prevention of neck pain. Perhaps the placement of the desk, computer workstation and/or placement of the computer monitor and keyboard can be improved to encourage improved upper back and neck posture.

When sitting erect at a desk and looking straight ahead:

  • Eyes should point directly at the top third of the screen.
  • Forearms should be approximately parallel with the floor when typing.
  • Elbows should be at the side.
  • Feet should be flat on the floor with the thighs parallel with the floor.

If patients have a standing work station or perform other sorts of sitting or driving tasks, make sure that one side of the body is not constantly rotated more than the other side, and that there is as much symmetry in repetitive tasks as possible.

Persistent movements to one side or constant rotation of the neck and back to the same side can often aggravate joints and soft tissues causing neck and back pain. Some patients can develop poor posture of the head, neck, and shoulders through repetitive work tasks and/or poor sitting habits.

There are stretches and exercises that are effective at helping restore good posture, thereby taking pressure off the neck and relieving pain.

See Simple Office Chair Stretch

BRO-Logo-colorBlue Ridge Orthopaedic & Spine Center has on-site state-of-the-art technology to diagnosis and treat orthopaedic conditions. For your convenience, both of our offices are equipped with in-office radiology departments. Not only does this facilitate rapid diagnosis but it is also convenient for patients who may be experiencing pain or disability at the time of their visit. To schedule an appointment with one of our board-certified and fellowship trained physicians, call our Warrenton  office at 540-347-9220 or our Gainesville office at 703-743-2814.